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Gut Bacteria May Be Causing Your Anxiety

Did you know that the GUT is your SECOND BRAIN? The vagus nerve facilitates direct communication between the gut and the brain. The human intestinal tract contains approximately 100 trillion bacteria. Recent research now reveals that bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract generate signals that influence the brain, especially our mood and emotional states.

In this post, I am going to report on fascinating research conducted by Stephen Collins at McMaster University in Canada. Collins used two different strains of mice for this experiment. For simplicity I will call call them Strain A and Strain B. Strain A have been bred to high levels of anxiety. They are very timid and anxious. Strain B are bred to be very courageous, bold and exploratory.

Collins and his colleagues took bacterial samples from the intestinal tract of each strain of mice and implanted the samples into the opposite strain. This caused a complete reversal of the behaviors of both strains of mice. The mice with high levels of anxiety become bold, courageous and exploratory. Conversely, the mice that were formerly bold and courageous became very timid and anxious.

Changing gut bacteria totally altered behavior. This research suggests the following: Your Anxiety May Originate In Your Gut, Not In Your Head. Collin’s study was published in Current Opinion in Microbiology, Vol. 16(3), June 2013.

This is one of the topics I will be covering in great depth in my soon-to-be-launched 3-Hour WEBinar on Natural Therapies for Depression and Anxiety. Please share this information with people you know who might be interested in this topic.

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© 2016 ROSS PELTON